Book Tour Review: Star Daughter by Shevta Thakrar @HearOurVoicesBT

Star Daughter

by Shveta Thakrar

Publisher: HarperTeen

Release Date: August 11, 2020

Genre: Young Adult Fantasy

Format: E-ARC from Edelweiss+

My Rating: 4.25 stars

Goodreads | IndieBound | Barnes & Noble | Amazon

Synopsis

This gorgeously imagined YA debut blends shades of Neil Gaiman’s Stardust and a breathtaking landscape of Hindu mythology into a radiant contemporary fantasy.

The daughter of a star and a mortal, Sheetal is used to keeping secrets. Pretending to be “normal.” But when an accidental flare of her starfire puts her human father in the hospital, Sheetal needs a full star’s help to heal him. A star like her mother, who returned to the sky long ago.

Sheetal’s quest to save her father will take her to a celestial court of shining wonders and dark shadows, where she must take the stage as her family’s champion in a competition to decide the next ruling house of the heavens–and win, or risk never returning to Earth at all.

Brimming with celestial intrigue, this sparkling YA debut is perfect for fans of Roshani Chokshi and Laini Taylor.


My Thoughts


I can describe the way I feel about this book in one sentence, rather one word actually, BEAUTIFUL. This book was beautiful. It was both beautiful on the outside and also on the inside. I did have a few problems with it, but overall this book was just really really good. Let’s start with what I loved about this book first.

What I loved:
1) I am in love with Shevta Thakrar’s writing. Her writing is mesmerising, something I got totally lost into. I marked so many quotes in this book. Actually after a time I stopped marking quotes, because if I had kept on doing that I would have end up marking up the entire book!

2) I think this point is the main reason I loved this book so much. Star Daughter was so Indian. From the clothes to the food to the Gods, to the way they addressed each other, everything was so Indian. Each time a Indian food was mentioned, or an Indian mythology reference was made, I just instantly smiled, my Indian heart became so so happy.

3) I loved the characters of this book so much. Sheetal, Minal, Dev, Charumati, Radhikafoi, everyone. And the friendship between Minal and Sheetal was so great. I wished I had a friend like that. And this book also had two really cute and beautiful YA romances. Even though one had only a few pages dedicated to it, but still I really enjoyed it, and rooted for them like my life depended on it.

4) One last point. I really loved how Shevta Thakrar took some already used YA fantasy elements and wove Hindu mythology and her own writing magic in them and transformed them into something so beautiful, incredible and fascinating and amazing, and very other adjective you can think of.

What I didn’t like:
I think the main complain I had with this book was some parts in the middle of the novel felt a bit draggy and slow for me. Other than this there was one more thing, I wanted one tiny portion of this book to be explained a little bit more.


2 Of My Favourite Quotes

(The quotes are from ARC, hence are subject to change)

Magic isolates you. You’re this misfit who doesn’t belong anywhere, and you want to make it all go away but at the same time, you crave it, and you can’t help craving it. You’re just stuck.

Even though Minal and Radhikafoi were watching, she couldn’t stop. She was like smoke, like flame, like dreams that whirled eternally through the deep jet-black expanse of space.

About the Author

Shveta Thakrar is a part-time nagini and full-time believer in magic. Her work has appeared in a number of magazines and anthologies including Enchanted Living, Uncanny Magazine, A Thousand Beginnings and Endings, and Toil & Trouble. Her debut young adult fantasy novel, Star Daughter, is forthcoming from HarperTeen on August 11, 2020. When not spinning stories about spider silk and shadows, magic and marauders, and courageous girls illuminated by dancing rainbow flames, Shveta crafts, devours books, daydreams, travels, bakes, and occasionally even plays her harp.

13 thoughts on “Book Tour Review: Star Daughter by Shevta Thakrar @HearOurVoicesBT

  1. I love that this fantasy includes Hindu mythology and Indian culture! The use of the same kind of mythology over and over again in fantasies can get repetitive, so this looks fun. Your review made me put this book on hold at the library, I’m excited to read it!

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    1. YAAAA! I loved the Indian rep. They were using Indian words to address each other and the Gods were also all Indian and the foods were so good. I just wish Shveta Thakrar had included some non-veg food too! But most Hindus are vegetarian, so it is fine!!!!

      Like

  2. I can read your enthusiasm for the writing the Indian rep through this review and I absolutely love it 😀 this was already on my TBR but now I’m even MORE excited to get my hands on it! Lovely review 🙂

    Like

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